British pop star Lily Allen has launched a scathing attack on the New York Times - after executives allegedly sold exclusive photos of her home without permission.
The Smile hitmaker recently agreed to an interview and photoshoot with the publication, but was devastated when the paper's shots, taken in her London residence, turned up in British magazine OK.
And Allen has accused newspaper bosses at the New York Times of taking advantage of her decision to let their photographer into her private rooms - and selling the pictures on for a profit, cutting her out of the loop.
She writes on her MySpace.com blog, "It is unusual for me to allow photographers into my home, but these seemed like special circumstances and after all TNYT is one of the most respected news publications in the world.
"I was mortified (when I saw the pictures in OK), in fact I was in tears, six photos of inside my home for everyone to see, and a made up interview that was very misleading. All this because Id let the NYT photographer into my home. I was furious and got on the phone immediately.
"I got an apology from OK, but the NYT refuse to accept what they have done is morally wrong. Everybody assures me this is completely unheard of for the NYT to act in such a cheap and disgusting way."
Allen also published an email response from bosses at the New York Times, in which they claim there was no contract in place to prevent them syndicating the pictures.
But the star criticised the publication's reply, adding: "So patronising, and gross. I think the NYT have behaved really badly. Its one thing posing for a picture from TNYT and wholly another letting OK into your house, and I didnt even get paid."