loudQUIETloud: A Film About The Pixies Movie Review

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If you're a fan of alternative rock music, you might recall an odd announcement from 2004, which heralded the unlikely reunion of The Pixies, the influential post-punk band that found modest success before disbanding amidst creative difficulties. But The Pixies had that rare legacy that outlived their time actually recording and touring. Most famously Kurt Cobain cited them as one of his most critical influences. And "Where Is My Mind?," perhaps their most famous (and best) song, plays over the final scene of Fight Club, as if it were almost custom written for the film.

But that was The Pixies then. The Pixies now are an older, weathered, almost beat-down quartet. Frank Black is considerably obese (and bald). Kim Deal has finally come out of rehab. David Lovering attempted a career as a magician and a metal-detecting beachcomber. And Joey Santiago settled down with a family.

And here they were, back together and playing concerts. Which sold out. Rapidly. The Pixies reunion turned out to be one of biggest things in music this decade so far. I never saw any of the shows, but having seen loudQUIETloud, I feel like I now have. lQl is a lot like spending an hour and a half on the road with these guys, now geezers compared to today's youth-driven rock. And if you're a fan of the Pixies' music, that's not such a bad way to spend those 90 minutes: 15 classic Pixies songs are performed in whole or in part over the course of the movie. Nothing but hits here.

But those looking for deep personal insights may be disappointed. Unlike insightful and similar films like, say, Metallica: Some Kind of Monster, the reformed Pixies don't have a whole lot to say. In fact, there's not much to say on the whole. Frankly, the big question -- why are The Pixies reuniting now? -- is never fully answered. The popular response (courtesy of fans polled at random) is the obvious one: For the money.

This isn't to say that lQl isn't without some emotional core. Deal is charming in her insecurity. Black is like an angry Santa, and drummer Lovering's attempts at magic (and substance abuse issues) are almost sad. But this stuff doesn't really make up the bulk of the film. After concert footage, the film largely concerns itself with Black giving reporters phone interviews in his underwear. I wished that the directors had been more in the faces of the members of the band, but they have a very nonconfrontational approach to the film. In fact, they aren't visible in it at all. A little more pushing and shoving might have gleaned some more insights about how the band has changed over the years... but then again, fans rightfully describe the film as "subtle." That's an apt description (and it's still a fun movie)... but it's a little out of place for a very loud musical group.

The DVD includes deleted scenes (Lovering showing off his metal detecting collection is the easy highlight) and a commentary track.

Aka (incorrectly) loudQUIETloud: A Film About Pixies.

Cast & Crew

Director : , Matthew Galkin

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loudQUIETloud: A Film About The Pixies Rating

" Good "

Rating: NR, 2006

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