One thing critics appear to agree on in their reviews of 2 Guns: those guns fire a lot of ammunition -- thousands of rounds, according to USA Today critic Claudia Puig, who concludes: By its conclusion the story has worked so hard to be twisting and clever that it runs out of steam and becomes outlandish, marked by a surplus of violence -- too often casual and gratuitous -- for what essentially is a buddy cop movie. If you become confused watching all those twists and cleverness, then Kyle Smith in the New York Post has this advice: Just go ahead and assume that everybody is trying to kill everybody and you'll be relatively clear. But several critics are willing to forgive the confusing aspects of the film because of the strong performances of the two stars. As Joe Neumaier writes in the New York Daily News: Pure charisma is sometimes the best special effect. That's what Denzel Washington and Mark Wahlberg bring to 2 Guns, and after a season full of superhero duds, they deliver a crucial dose of cool. Ann Hornaday in the Washington Post, while writing that the reckless gunplay is offensive and the verbal repartee is too often stale, Nevertheless concludes that what gives director Baltasar Kormakur an edge is that he has Wahlberg and Washington, each doing what he does best: Wahlberg playing the trusting, over-eager puppy dog with the eyes of a sniper and Washington keeping it cool under an assortment of porkpie hats and shades. Manohla Dargis in The New York Times describes the two characters as one of the better odd couples to Bond and bicker since Mel met Danny. (She refers to the Lethal Weapon series with Mel Gibson and Danny Glover.) And, echoes Rafer Guzmán in Newsday: It's a jumbled film with a lazy plot and poorly sketched action sequences, but the natural charm of its two stars, along with some colorful bit players, may put you in a forgiving mood.