Chopra Blames Jackson's Doctors For Drug Problems

Tags: DR - Deepak Chopra - Michael Jackson

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Celebrated spiritualist and author DR. Deepak Chopra has blamed the many doctors surrounding Michael Jackson for fuelling his alleged addiction to painkillers - insisting the star was given multiple prescriptions from various medics.
Police seized a variety of pills and medications from Jackson's home following his death on Thursday (25Jun09) amid swirling rumours the star was addicted to painkillers - which may have been a factor in his untimely passing.
Chopra fell out with Jackson in 2005 after the doctor refused to write his pal a prescription for drugs he said he needed.
He claims Jackson became hooked on narcotics because he was being given the wrong pills by his doctors - which lead the singer to believe he couldn't survive without heavy pain medication.
Chopra argues there should have been tighter controls on what Jackson was taking, insisting he should only have been treated by one "competent" doctor.
He tells E! Online, "(Jackson) was extraordinary when he was in his ecstatic states. But he was also troubled, and he surrounded himself with people who were enablers and frequently avoided people who were trying to help him.
"In the year 2005 after the trial (on child molestation charges, of which he was acquitted), he came and stayed with us for a few days, and during that time he asked me for a prescription for OxyContin. I was very surprised, and I said, 'Why do you want that?' And he said, 'I have back pain.' And I said, 'You don't need that narcotic for back pain.' And then, as I probed, I found out that he was taking a lot of narcotics prescribed by different physicians.
"Somebody like that is obviously not in a normal state of consciousness. After a while, actually, they actually believe that, if they didn't get their fix, or the drug, or the narcotic, they might die…When you're prescribing narcotics, you need to be with very competent doctors."


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