Rocker Steven Tyler is urging U.S. Supreme Court officials to step up their legislation against indecency and the use of profanity on broadcast TV before programmes start becoming too "crass".
In 2010, a New York federal appeals court stripped the Federal Communications Commission (Fcc) of its authority to ban the use of a single curse word on live television and fine broadcasters for airing segments of nudity.
Fcc officials have since appealed the ruling and U.S. Supreme Court legislators are set to begin a hearing on the future of decency in broadcasting on Tuesday (10Jan12) - and it has sparked the interest of one unlikely supporter.
Aerosmith frontman Tyler is no stranger to profanity and indecency - he was censored for using an expletive during an appearance on American Idol - but he admits there's a fine line between an occasional mishap and a steady stream of swear words.
And Tyler insists TV shows should be regulated and bosses held accountable for their programming.
He tells the Associated Press, "There's a certain charm and passion and magic in not showing full-frontal nudity. It's really hot when you only show a little...
"I have (cursed on air) a couple times, because it is 2012. If you start surfing channel to channel and you're on (U.S.network) NBC and it's (expletive) on channel 4 and it's (expletive) on channel 7 and it's (expletive)... it wouldn't be fun to surf."